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Some Tips on eBook publishing

 How easy is book publishing?   Beyond the exaltation and exuberance in bringing your imagination into emotion-evoking words to give readers the best reading experience, book publishing is a matter of money. Or, in the present market sense, a business.    Image is taken from free Pexel.com I thought I would have published my debut story, Under the Bakula Tree by September.   November is passing. Even now, I am not able to set a publishing date for it.  No, I wasn't sick, toiling these months in preparation for my publishing.  In September, I had no clue of what was awaiting me. I believe many of you have a story idea inside you, itching you to bring it out to publish. Then, this post is also for you to caution you against the pitfalls waiting for you in the process and to best be aware of them to avoid falling into the traps.   And that beyond the exaltation and exuberance in bringing out your imagination into emotion-evoking words to give the best reading experience to readers, it

The Narrative style of Kamba Ramayana

The Showing Narrative of Kamba Ramayana "Bleached bones lay where animals had perished, including those of monstrous serpents with jaws open deadly thirst; into these enormous jaws had rushed (says the poet) elephants desperately seeking shade, all dead and fossilized, the serpents and the elephants alike."  Photo by  Errin Casano  from  Pexels In an earlier post,  Showing Versus Telling   about “showing versus telling’ a narrative style in creative writing.  I wrote there; I was a practitioner and admirer of telling before taking a creative writing course because that was easy, and I hadn't known about showing.  Also, I concluded that showing is a modern narrative style discovered by contemporary creative writers. My curiosity took me to research the ancient work of the Indian epic, Ramayana, to learn about its narrative style.  And the outcome was amazing.   I felt rewarded for getting anxious, and I am happy to share my amazement with my readers. Before I go further, I

Showing Versus Telling in Creative Writing

  Showing Versus Telling The above is a writing rule I learned from my creative writing course at All About Writing. Before I joined the course, I had no clue about the writing rules.  Even after the course, I'm not sure I grasped all the rules, or grasping and practising are two different things.  The template in the post introduces the difference between telling and showing.  What is telling in writing?  As I know it, Telling is an easy method.   You create a scene, and at some point, your character is petrified.  You can use adjectives like angry, troubled, upset, and so on, the reason many of us prefer it.  What is showing?  To show is an effort; we should show the character's reactions on the face, body, voice, and explain the surroundings, the smell, the sound.  Get the reader to engage with all senses for the emotional connection, do not come naturally, need to practise.    It brings specific details about his facial expressions, body language and voice modulations.   To

Chimamanda Adichie-My Favourite Authors

  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie My favourite Authors The photo was taken from her author website Who is your favourite author is not an easy question to answer because of the difficulty to pinpoint one from among the list of the many. But you can list them in the order of your preference. The top on my list is, without a doubt, Chimamanda Adichie.  About Chimamanda Adichie Who is Adichie?  I don't think she needs an introduction to the creative world, but let me introduce her to those who need it.  Adichie is a Nigerian born writer thrown into international fame for her publications covering fiction and non-fiction.  Her work includes Purple Hibiscus (2003), her first novel, Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), Americanah (2013), a string of short stories and a short story collection-The Thing around your neck (2009). She is the recipient of many accolades and awards: The Purple Hibiscus won the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half a Yellow Sun, the Orange Prize

Nelson Mandela Day

 18 July Nelson Mandela Day As the world reflects Nelson Mandela's legacy, we thank his life, leadership, devotion to humanity, and humanitarian causes. Mandela (18 July 1918--5 December 2013) Nelson Mandela, the Republic of South Africa's first president, does not need an introduction to the world.  His birthday, July 18, is declared Nelson Mandela International Day, and South Africans take this opportunity to celebrate his life the entire month.  South Africa became an independent republic in 1994, overhauling the apartheid that ran the show as a legal regime since 1948, Mandela, its first president.   Mandela's contribution to the peaceful transformation of South Africa, from a racially pitting people into a rainbow nation, is the most celebrated example of positivity.  This positivity shines on every individual when they make an individual positive action to help and reach others.  July is a month for taking this action and spread the Mandela values--fighting injustice,

Apple of My Eye

  Picture from Google. Madhuri stuffed her bag with the steel tiffin box, small flask, and purse, dropped it on the Glossy creed black and white coffee table. Pulled the diary out of the bag, scribbled the grocery list stuffed it back. Removed two bulging plastic files inside the table made them flop near the bag.  Just another day, she gasped. She measured her movement as she sat on the sofa.  The September sun sneaked in through the window signalled a throbbing headache, a lacklustre sensation.  She was strongly inclined to take a break from everything to take a trip to somewhere alone-will it ever happen?  "One minute ma," Ankush called out from upstairs.  It was nearly eight. She should be on the road now.  A throb on the temple blinded her-- she hushed it with a fingertip and craned the head to scan the stairs. Not a sign of him.    "I have a test in the first lesson Ma, cannot wait for him," Megha reminded her from the sofa across from her--she was ready for t

Teary Eyes

  She slipped into a pair of sandalwood shade pyjama, pulled over the head a jacquard cotton salwar top, pinned the pleated maroon shawl on the shoulder. Na, not going to wrap it around the neck.  She sleeked down the pleats to make her look a head taller and hide the fat around the middle. In the dressing table not being full length couldn't figure out how the pair of designer sandal in maroon matched with the rest of the attire. With a smile oozing with self-pride, she grabbed her purse, locked the room stepped out into the hotel foyer to the walkway outside.  The milky air outside was fresh. The leaves of the hibiscus lined by the walkway were wet from the morning rain. She touched them fondly, shattering the water pearls dancing on the edges.   A lazy breeze from the valley of Neem trees cuddled her hair loosened a fringe to tumble on to her forehead.   The road in the front hadn't changed a bit in the years. The clusters of old shops on the sides teetering with the goodies

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